Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/129540
Authors: 
Saygin, Perihan Ozge
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Mannheim 12-21
Abstract: 
In Turkey, as in many other countries, female students perform better in high school and have higher test scores than males. Nevertheless, men still predominate at highly selective programs that lead to high-paying careers. The gender gap at elite schools is particularly puzzling because college admissions are based entirely on nationwide exam scores. Using detailed administrative data from the centralized college entrance system, I study the impact of gender differences in preferences for programs and schools on the allocation of students to colleges. Controlling for test score and high school attended, I find that females are more likely to apply to lower-ranking schools, whereas males set a higher bar, revealing a higher option value for re-taking the test and applying again next year. I also find that females and males value program attributes differently, with females placing more weight on the distance from home to college, and males placing more weight on program attributes that are likely to lead to better job placements. Together, these differences in willingness to be unassigned and in relative preferences for school attributes can explain much of the gender gap at the most elite programs.
Subjects: 
gender gap
college admissions
school choice
JEL: 
C35
I20
I24
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
630.53 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.