Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/129438
Authors: 
Chatterjee, Swarn
Palmer, Lance
Goetz, Joseph
Year of Publication: 
2012
Citation: 
[Journal:] Applied Economics Research Bulletin [Volume:] 8 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 1-22
Abstract: 
This study uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine whether self-regulation, proxied by regularly dining together with family, is associated with better financial preparedness and greater wealth accumulation across time among households. Findings reveal that individuals who had sufficient self-regulation to regularly eat meals together with their family, increased wealth at a faster rate than others between 1994 and 2004. Moreover, those who exhibited self-regulation by frequently spending mealtime with their family showed greater preference for investment portfolio diversification. Consistent with other studies, results indicate that wealth accumulation increased with age, income, and educational attainment.
Subjects: 
Individual wealth
Behavioral Economics
Portfolio Allocation
Self Regulation
JEL: 
D14
D31
D91
D03
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
109.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.