Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/128055
Authors: 
Herger, Nils
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Study Center Gerzensee 08.04
Abstract: 
Using count data on the number of bank failures in US states during the 1960 to 2006 period, this paper endeavors to establish how far sources of economic risk (recessions, high interest rates, inflation) or differences in solvency and branching regulation can explain some of the fragility in banking. Assuming that variables are predetermined, lagged values provide instruments to absorb potential endogeneity between the number of bank failures and economic and regulatory conditions. Results suggest that bank failures are not merely self-fulfilling prophecies but relate systematically to inflation as well as to policy changes in banking regulation. Furthermore, in terms of statistical and economic significance, the distribution and development of bankruptcies across US states depends crucially on past bank failures suggesting that contagion provides an important channel through which banking crises emerge.
Subjects: 
bank failures
banking crisis
count data
JEL: 
G21
G28
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
292.64 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.