Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/127384
Authors: 
Lohse, Johannes
Goeschl, Timo
Diederich , Johannes
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics 566
Abstract: 
Recent experimental research has examined whether contributions to public goods can be traced back to intuitive or deliberative decision-making, using response times in public good games in order to identify the specific decision process at work. In light of conflicting results, this paper reports on an analysis of response time data from an online experiment in which over 3400 subjects from the general population decided whether to contribute to a real world public good. The between-subjects evidence confirms a strong positive link between contributing and deliberation and between free-riding and intuition. The average response time of contributors is 40 percent higher than that of free-riders. A within-subject analysis reveals that for a given individual, contributing significantly increases and free-riding significantly decreases the amount of deliberation required.
Subjects: 
Public Goods
Cooperation
Dual Process Theories
Response Times
Climate Change
Online Experiment
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
465.46 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.