Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/127325
Authors: 
Sproten, Alec
Diener, Carsten
Fiebach, Christian
Schwieren, Christiane
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics 508
Abstract: 
In an aging society, it becomes more and more important to understand how aging affects decision making. Older adults have to face many situations that require consequential financial decisions. In the present study, we examined the effects of aging on decisions in two domains of uncertainty: risk and ambiguity. For this purpose, a group of young and older adults played a card game which was composed of risky and ambiguous conditions. In the risk condition, participants knew the probabilities to win or loose the game (i.e. full information), whereas in the ambiguous condition, these probabilities were unknown (thus, there was lack of information). When confronted with risky decisions, the behaviour of older and young adults (measured by the number of times participants chose a gamble instead of a sure amount of money) did not differ. In contrast, under ambiguity, there were significant age-effects in decision making: older people were less ambiguity-averse than young subjects. We conclude that there exist differences in uncertainty-processing between young and older adults, and discuss possible explanations of these differences.
Subjects: 
Age differences
experiment
risk and uncertainty
JEL: 
J14
C91
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
225.07 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.