Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/127221
Authors: 
Becker, Christian
Faber, Malte
Hertel, Kirsten
Manstetten, Reiner
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics 404
Abstract: 
In this paper the view of humankind and nature upon which the thinking of Malthus is founded will be reflected on and contrasted with the opposed understanding of his contemporary Wordsworth. We show that the economic considerations of both are based decidedly on the premise of these views, and that their alternative interpretations of the contemporary economy and the relationship between economy and nature may thus be explained. From the comparison of Malthus and Wordsworth we draw conclusions for modern ecological economics, identifying its Malthusian understanding of nature and reflecting on the capacities and limits implied for further research. We ascribe a central role in the conceptual history of ecological economics to Wordsworth and present his philosophical presumptions as a fruitful alternative for ecological economics. Finally, attention will be drawn to the principle importance of the philosophical foundations underpinning this field of research.
Subjects: 
Malthus
Wordsworth
history of economic thought
history of ecological economics
foundations of ecological economics
JEL: 
B00
B12
B19
B31
Q59
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
138.58 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.