Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/126656
Authors: 
Kalenkoski, Charlene M.
Oumtrakool, Eakamon
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9568
Abstract: 
Using data from the 2010 and 2012 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS) and the associated Well-being Modules, this paper examines how caregiving affects the well-being of retirees who are caregivers. Different caregiving activities are examined, including caring for household children, caring for non-household children, caring for household adults, and caring for non-household adults. Different aspects of well-being are examined, including how meaningful respondents find their activities and how happy, sad, tired, in pain, and stressed their activities make them. The results show that, controlling for selection into caregiving, most caregiving negatively affects the well-being of retirees. This suggests that policies that remove some of the caregiving burden from retirees would increase their well-being.
Subjects: 
caregiving
well-being
retirement
time use
JEL: 
D10
D13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
333.2 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.