Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/126491
Authors: 
De Weerdt, Joachim
Beegle, Kathleen
Friedman, Jed
Gibson, John
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
LICOS Discussion Paper Series 365
Abstract: 
There is widespread interest in estimating the number of hungry people in the world and trends in hunger. Current global counts rely on combining each country's total food balance with information on distribution patterns from household consumption expenditure surveys. Recent research has advocated for calculating hunger numbers directly from these same surveys. For either approach, embedded in this effort are a number of important details about how household surveys are designed and how these data are then used. Using a survey experiment in Tanzania, this study finds great fragility in hunger counts stemming from alternative survey designs. As a consequence, comparable hunger numbers will be lacking until more effort is made to either harmonize survey designs or better understand the consequences of survey design variation.
Subjects: 
hunger prevalence
measurement error
consumption
survey design
JEL: 
C88
O12
Q18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.