Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/126381
Authors: 
Addison, Tony
Gisselquist, Rachel
Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel
Singhal, Saurabh
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Working Paper 2015/063
Abstract: 
Conflict depletes all forms of human and social capital, as well as supporting institutions. The scale of the human damage can overwhelm public action, as there are many competing priorities and resources are often insufficient. What then should be the priorities for 'post-conflict' policy? Should it give, for example, higher priority to health or to livelihoods in allocating the resources available (financial, human, and institutional)? Should social protection be the main focus of effort and, if so, what form should it take? If trying to do everything amounts to doing nothing, then what should be the priorities over time, that guide the sequence of actions? This paper explores the issues - the opportunities but also the possible tensions - including those around the need to strengthen and sustain peace itself.
Subjects: 
peace
post-conflict reconstruction
poverty
human development
social protection
JEL: 
H56
I15
I25
I38
ISBN: 
978-92-9230-952-7
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
347.57 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.