Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125726
Authors: 
Veugelers, Reinhilde
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
WWWforEurope Working Paper 73
Abstract: 
In this contribution we describe how green policies should be designed to activate private innovation forces for ecological transitions. We look at the evidence on the current deployment of green policies and the current performance of the private green innovation machine. We try to assess how strong which types of government interventions have and can be to power the green innovation machine. An important insight from the economic analysis of the effectiveness of the public intervention for green innovations, is the complementarity between policy instruments, requiring an adequate policy mix of instruments, rather than a focus on individual instruments. The evidence provides little support for the efficacy of single instruments, like subsidies, when used in isolation. For the EU, this is perhaps the biggest challenge for its green technology policy: the lack of a sufficiently high carbon price. And as the evidence has shown that the world of green science and technologies is an emerging global, multipolar one, with many geographically dispersed sources in the various green scientific fields and technologies, coordination of green policies internationally should therefore be high on the policy agenda.
Subjects: 
Ecological innovation
Economic growth path
Globalisation
Green jobs
Innovation
Innovation policy
New technologies
Patents
Policy options
Research
Socio-ecological transition
JEL: 
O31
O38
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.