Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125539
Authors: 
Mattias, Nordin
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Uppsala University 2015:5
Abstract: 
I investigate the causal effect of access to relevant local television on i) U.S. citizens' knowledge of their senators' actions in the Senate and ii) whether citizens hold their senators accountable for these actions. To do so, I utilize the mismatch between the local television markets and the states. This mismatch causes citizens living in counties where local television stations are based in their own state (in-state counties) to have greater access to relevant news about their senators, compared to citizens living in counties served by local television based in a neighboring state (out-of-state counties). Using survey data from the 2006 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, I find that the biased coverage of local television news leads to citizens in in-state counties, compared to out-of-state counties, to be more informed about their senators' roll-call votes, as well as more likely to hold opinions about these senators. However, I do not find that the increased knowledge affects the likelihood that citizens evaluate their senators based on the roll-call votes. This result suggests that passively acquired information through local television is not sufficient for individuals to hold their senators accountable for their actions in the Senate.
Subjects: 
local television
political information
natural experiment
roll-call votes
JEL: 
D72
D80
H50
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
804.35 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.