Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125536
Authors: 
Bühren, Christoph
Daskalakis, Maria
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Joint Discussion Paper Series in Economics 34-2015
Abstract: 
Which behavior-based interventions are more appropriate to induce energy saving: energy saving goals with or without incentive, energy saving products, environmentally related information, social comparison or competition? We try to answer this question in a comprehensive study. First, we designed energy bills with different behavioral interventions. Second, we evaluated their appropriateness in an empirical survey with 457 participants. Third, we tested behavioral consequences in real effort lab experiments with 550 subjects in 11 treatments and one baseline. Our results indicate that monetary incentives to save energy might foster the intention to invest effort in energy saving but backfire if factual performance is required. Instead, fostering non-incentivized self-set goals and providing social comparison induced substantial effort to protect the environment. Non-incentivized competition to save energy provided the best results. Our study concludes with implications for practical policy design and further need of research.
Subjects: 
Environmental behavior
Goals
Incentives
Social Comparison
Competition
Experiment
JEL: 
D03
D12
C91
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
661.39 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.