Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125390
Authors: 
Sierminska, Eva
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 161
Abstract: 
It is a well-established view amongst economists that good-looking people have a better chance of employment and can earn more than those who are less physically attractive. A “beauty premium” is particularly apparent in jobs where there is a productivity gain associated with good looks, though this is different for women and men, and varies across countries. People also sort into occupations according to the relative returns to their physical characteristics; good-looking people take jobs where physical appearance is deemed important while less-attractive people steer away from them, or they are required to be more productive for the same wage.
Subjects: 
beauty premium
wages
discrimination
gender differentials
occupational sorting
physical attractiveness
JEL: 
D31
J24
J30
J70
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.