Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125376
Authors: 
Vivarelli, Marco
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 154
Abstract: 
Studies find that technological change has contributed to the decline in manufacturing and to persistent unemployment in many advanced economies. While process innovation can be job-destroying, product innovation can imply the emergence of new firms, new sectors, and thus new jobs. But even for process innovation, the final impact on labor demand is shaped by market mechanisms that can compensate for the direct job-destroying impact if market and institutional rigidities do not impede them. Policies should maximize the job-creation effect of product innovation and minimize the direct labor-saving impact of process innovation.
Subjects: 
innovation
technological change
R&D
employment
technological unemployment
JEL: 
O33
J21
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.