Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125256
Authors: 
Averett, Susan L.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 32
Abstract: 
Rising obesity is not only a pressing global public health problem. There is also substantial evidence that obese people, particularly women, are less likely to be employed and, when employed, are likely to earn lower wages. There is some evidence that the lower earnings are a result of discriminatory hiring and sorting into jobs with less customer contact. Understanding whether obesity is associated with adverse labor market outcomes and ascertaining the source of these outcomes are essential for designing effective public policy.
Subjects: 
obesity
BMI
wages
employment
occupation
absenteeism
JEL: 
J7
J78
J71
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.