Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125248
Authors: 
Brainerd, Elizabeth
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 23
Abstract: 
Since 1989 fertility and family formation have declined sharply in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Fertility rates are converging on—and sometimes falling below—rates in Western Europe, most of which are below replacement levels. Concerned about a shrinking and aging population and strains on pension systems, governments are using incentives to encourage people to have more children. These policies seem only modestly effective in countering the impacts of widespread social changes, including new work opportunities for women and stronger incentives to invest in education.
Subjects: 
fertility
pronatalist policies
transition economies
JEL: 
J13
J18
P36
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.