Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125021
Authors: 
Winters, John V.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9512
Abstract: 
College graduates are considerably more mobile than non-graduates, and previous literature suggests that the difference is at least partially attributable to college graduates being more responsive to employment opportunities in other areas. However, there exist considerable differences in migration rates by college major that have gone largely unexplained. This paper uses microdata from the American Community Survey to examine how the migration decisions of young college graduates are affected by earnings in their college major. Results indicate that higher major-specific earnings in an individual's state of birth reduce out-migration suggesting that college graduates are attracted toward areas that especially reward the specific type of human capital that they possess.
Subjects: 
graduate migration
college major
college graduates
human capital
JEL: 
J24
J61
R23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
470.11 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.