Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125018
Authors: 
Edlund, Lena
Machado, Cecilia
Sviatschi, Maria
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9502
Abstract: 
In 1980, housing prices in the main US cities rose with distance to the city center. By 2010, that relationship had reversed. We propose that this development can be traced to greater labor supply of high-income households through reduced tolerance for commuting. In a tract-level data set covering the 27 largest US cities, years 1980-2010, we employ a city-level Bartik demand shifter for skilled labor and find support for our hypothesis: full-time skilled workers favor proximity to the city center and their increased presence can account for the observed price changes, notably the rising price premium commanded by centrality.
Subjects: 
gentrification
returns to skill
time use
location choice
JEL: 
R21
R30
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
333.77 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.