Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125015
Authors: 
Gibson, John
McKenzie, David
Rohorua, Halahingano
Stillman, Steven
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9492
Abstract: 
We examine the long-term impacts of international migration by comparing immigrants who had successful ballot entries in a migration lottery program, and first moved almost a decade ago, with people who had unsuccessful entries into those same ballots. The long-term gain in income is found to be similar in magnitude to the gain in the first year, despite migrants upgrading their education and changing their locations and occupations. This results in large sustained benefits to their immediate family, who have substantially higher consumption, durable asset ownership, savings, and dietary diversity. In contrast we find no measureable impact on extended family.
Subjects: 
international migration
natural experiment
assimilation
household well-being
JEL: 
F22
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
780.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.