Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125007
Authors: 
Kaushal, Neeraj
Lu, Yao
Denier, Nicole
Wang, Julia Shu-Huah
Trejo, Stephen
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9495
Abstract: 
We study the short-term trajectories of employment, hours worked, and real wages of immigrants in Canada and the U.S. using nationally representative longitudinal datasets covering 1996-2008. Models with person fixed effects show that on average immigrant men in Canada do not experience any relative growth in these three outcomes compared to men born in Canada. Immigrant men in the U.S., on the other hand, experience positive annual growth in all three domains relative to U.S. born men. This difference is largely on account of low-educated immigrant men, who experience faster or longer periods of relative growth in employment and wages in the U.S. than in Canada. We further compare longitudinal and cross-sectional trajectories and find that the latter over-estimate wage growth of earlier arrivals, presumably reflecting selective return migration.
Subjects: 
U.S. immigrants
Canadian immigrants
economic assimilation
longitudinal data
immigration
employment
wages
comparative study
JEL: 
J15
J3
J18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
322.51 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.