Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/124877
Authors: 
Grossman, Michael
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9369
Abstract: 
Many studies suggest that years of formal schooling completed is the most important correlate of good health. There is much less consensus as to whether this correlation reflects causality from more schooling to better health. The relationship may be traced in part to reverse causality and may also reflect "omitted third variables" that cause health and schooling to vary in the same direction. The past five years (2010-2014) have witnessed the development of a large literature focusing on the issue just raised. I deal with that literature and what can be learned from it in this paper. I conclude that there is enough conflicting evidence in the studies that I have reviewed to warrant more research on the question of whether more schooling does in fact cause better health outcomes.
Subjects: 
efficiency
causality
health
schooling
time preference
JEL: 
I10
I20
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
86.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.