Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/123568
Authors: 
Asongu, Simplice A.
Batuo, Michael E.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
AGDI Working Paper WP/12/038
Abstract: 
Despite over three decades of Liberalisation policies in Africa, income-inequality has stayed persistently high. Using updated panel data of 26 African countries spanning the period 1996-2010, this study examines the effect of liberalisation policies with particular focus on financial, trade, institutional, political and economic liberalisations on income-inequality. We find: that financial liberalisation has a levitated income-redistributive effect with the magnitude of the de jure measure (KAOPEN) higher than that of the de facto measure (FDI); that exports, trade and 'freedom to trade' have an equality incidence on income-distribution; and that institutional and political liberalisation has a negative impact. We also find that, economic freedom has a negative income-redistributive effect possibly because of the weight of its legal component. The impact of these policies implications are discussed in detail in this study.
Subjects: 
Liberalisation Policies
Income Inequality
Poverty
Africa
JEL: 
F30
F41
F50
O15
O55
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.