Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/123553
Authors: 
Asongu, Simplice A.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
AGDI Working Paper WP/12/014
Abstract: 
Why are some nations more effective at battling corruption than others? Are there different determinants in the fight against corruption across developing nations? How do wealth effects play-out when existing corruption-control levels matter in the corruption battle? To investigate these concerns we examine the determinants of corruption-control throughout the conditional distribution of the fight against corruption. The following broad findings are established. (1) Population growth is a (an) tool (impediment) in (to) the fight against corruption in Low (Middle) income countries. (2) Democracy increases (decreases) corruption-control in Middle (Low) income countries. As a policy implication, blanket corruption-control strategies are unlikely to succeed equally across countries with different income-levels and political wills in the fight against corruption. Thus to be effective, corruption policies should be contingent on the prevailing levels of corruption-control and income-bracket.
Subjects: 
Corruption
Democracy
Government quality
Quantile regression
Africa
JEL: 
C10
H10
K10
O10
O55
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.