Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/123177
Authors: 
Non, Arjan
Tempelaar, Dirk
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 5533
Abstract: 
We analyze the relation between time preferences, study effort, and academic performance among first-year business and economics students. Time preferences are measured by stated preferences for an immediate payment over larger delayed payments. Data on study efforts are derived from an electronic learning environment, which records the amount of time students are logged in, the number of exercises generated, and the fraction of topics completed. Another measure of study effort is participation in an online summer course. We find no statistically significant relationship between impatience and study effort. However, we find that impatient students obtain lower grades and fail final exams more often, suggesting that impatient students are of lower unmeasured ability. Impatient students do not seem to have severe selfcontrol problems, as they do not earn significantly fewer study credits, nor are they more likely to drop out as a result of earning fewer study credits than required.
Subjects: 
time preferences
education
study effort
academic performance
JEL: 
D03
D90
I21
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.