Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/121995
Authors: 
Kregel, Jan
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Public Policy Brief, Jerome Levy Economics Institute of Bard College 139
Abstract: 
Emerging market economies are taking an ill-targeted and far too limited approach to addressing their ongoing problems with the international financial system, according to Senior Scholar Jan Kregel. In this policy brief, he explains why only a wholesale reform of the international financial architecture can adequately address these countries' concerns. As a blueprint for reform, Kregel recommends a radical proposal advanced in the 1940s, most notably by John Maynard Keynes. Keynes was among those who were developing proposals for shaping the international financial system in the immediate postwar period. His clearing union plan, itself inspired by Hjalmar Schacht's system of bilateral clearing agreements, would have effectively eliminated the need for an international reserve currency. Under Keynes's clearing union, trade and other international payments would be automatically facilitated through a global clearinghouse, using debits and credits denominated in a notional unit of account. The unit of account would have a fixed conversion rate to national currencies and could not be bought, sold, or traded - meaning no market for foreign currency would be required. Clearinghouse credits could only be used to offset debits by buying imports, and if not used within a specified period of time, the credits would be extinguished, giving export surplus countries an incentive to spend them. As Kregel points out, this would help support global demand and enable a shared adjustment burden. [...]
ISBN: 
978-1-936192-46-5
Document Type: 
Research Report

Files in This Item:
File
Size
202.84 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.