Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/121771
Authors: 
Jahnke, Björn
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Leibniz University of Hannover 564
Abstract: 
Sub-Saharan Africa economies introduced extensive reforms of their tax systems in the last two decades. In most of these countries taxes are now remitted through the self-assessment system that relies on quasi voluntary compliance and audit selection by risk. However, the revenues from direct taxes remained fairly stable and tax/GDP ratios lack behind the industrialized world. Several scholars argue that corruption is one of the major obstacles to increase tax revenues but focus on perceived corruption and remain on the macro-level. This study uses mirco-level data from the Afrobarometer survey wave 5 and thus relates personal corruption experiences to tax morale. The nationally representative survey includes information about corruption experiences in everyday situations when people need to get access to public goods in 31 sub-Saharan African countries. The paper finds that these petty corruption experiences significantly reduce the peoples willingness to pay taxes and hence contribute to the state community. The survey also provides information about trust in tax department in general as well as the perceived number of corrupt tax officials. A mediation analysis estimates that petty corruption experiences not only cause a directly negative effect on tax morale but also have indirectly affect on tax morale via reduced trust in the tax department.
Subjects: 
corruption
tax morale
institutional and governance quality
economic development
JEL: 
D73
H26
K42
F63
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
300.54 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.