Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/121474
Authors: 
Acheson, Graeme G.
Campbell, Gareth
Turner, John D.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-07
Abstract: 
Who financed the great expansion of the Victorian equity market, and what attracted them to invest? Using data on 453 firm-years and over 172,000 shareholders, we find that the largest providers of capital were rentiers, men with no formal occupation who relied on investment income. We also see a substantial growth in women investors as time progressed. In terms of clientele effects, we find that rentiers invested in large firms, whilst businessmen were the venture capitalists of young, regional enterprises. Women and the middle classes preferred safe investments, whilst financiers and institutional investors were speculators in foreign companies. Our results may help to explain the growth of new types of assets catering for particular clienteles, and the development of managerial policies on dividends and share issues.
Subjects: 
shareholders
equity
stock market
gentlemen capitalists
rentiers
gender
JEL: 
G10
N23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
695.09 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.