Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/120520
Authors: 
Carree, Martin
Kronenberg, Kristin
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
52nd Congress of the European Regional Science Association: "Regions in Motion - Breaking the Path", 21-25 August 2012, Bratislava, Slovakia
Abstract: 
This study identifies and analyzes the effects of university/college graduates' personal, household and employment characteristics as well as the attributes of their study, work and home locations on their college-to-work, college-to-residence, and commuting distances. The results illustrate that graduates are drawn to prospering regions with ample job opportunities, supposedly in order to advance their careers. They choose their places of residence so as to balance their commuting distances and the distances to their previous places of study. Residential amenities have a comparatively small effect on graduates' locational choices, whereas they appear to value accessibility of the place of residence.
Subjects: 
distance
migration
locational choice
commuting
college-to-work
college-to-residence
JEL: 
R23
R41
Document Type: 
Conference Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.