Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/120436
Authors: 
Bauer, Michal
Fiala, Nathan
Levely, Ian
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IES Working Paper 20/2014
Abstract: 
We use a set of experiments to study the effects of forced military service for a rebel group on social capital. We examine the case of Northern Uganda, where recruits did not self-select nor were systematically screened by rebels. We find that individual cooperativeness robustly increases with length of soldiering, especially among those who soldiered during early age. Parents of ex-soldiers are aware of the behavioral difference: they trust ex-soldiers more and expect them to be more trustworthy. These results suggest that the impact of child soldiering on social capital, in contrast to human capital, is not necessarily detrimental.
JEL: 
C93
D03
D74
O12
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.