Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/118489
Authors: 
Koster, Sierdjan
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
46th Congress of the European Regional Science Association: "Enlargement, Southern Europe and the Mediterranean", August 30th - September 3rd, 2006, Volos, Greece
Abstract: 
Spin-offs are considered successful founding efforts. The combination of relevant industry specific knowledge and direct support from a parent company make these firms stand out from the rest. Spin-offs are usually defined on the basis of the previous employment positions of the entrepreneurs. This method disregards the process of resource transfer that theoretically explains the differences in performance with other foundings. This paper offers an empirical analysis based on the actual resource transfer from parent firm to founding. Using the ERC dataset, entrepreneurial skills are used to explain the successful conclusion of the founding process. Having skills related to production seems to be beneficial, especially when the founding effort also receives support from the parent company. Receiving support as such does not render any positive results. Next to the effect of production skills, industry experience adds to the explanation of successful founding. It is probable that skills related to market knowledge, being part of a network, and reputation enhance chances of pre-entry survival as well.
Document Type: 
Conference Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.