Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/117330
Authors: 
Wahl, Fabian
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 08-2015
Abstract: 
This paper contributes to the understanding of the long-run consequences of Roman rule on economic development. In ancient times, the area of contemporary Germany was divided into a Roman and non-Roman part. The study uses this division to test whether the formerly Roman part of Germany show a higher nightlight luminosity than the non-Roman part. This is done by using the Limes wall as geographical discontinuity in a regression discontinuity design framework. The results indicate that economic development - as measured by luminosity - is indeed significantly and robustly larger in the formerly Roman parts of Germany. The study identifies the persistence of the Roman road network until the present as an important factor causing this development advantage of the formerly Roman part of Germany both by fostering city growth and by allowing for a denser road network.
Subjects: 
Roman Empire
Economic Development
Germany
Boundary Discontinuity
Transport Infrastructure
Persistence
JEL: 
N13
N73
O18
R12
R40
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
755.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.