Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/115542
Authors: 
Busso, Matías
Cristia, Julián
Humpage, Sarah
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IDB Working Paper Series IDB-WP-600
Abstract: 
Many families fail to vaccinate their children despite the supply of these services at no cost. This study tests whether personal reminders can increase demand for vaccination. A field experiment was conducted in rural Guatemala in which timely reminders were provided to families whose children were due for a vaccine. The six-month intervention increased the probability of vaccination completion by 2.2 percentage points among all children in treatment communities. Moreover, for children in treatment communities who were due to receive a vaccine, and whose parents were expected to be reminded about that due date, the probability of vaccination completion increased by 4.9 percentage points. The cost of an additional child with complete vaccination due to the intervention is estimated at about $7.50.
Subjects: 
Vaccination
Reminders
Field experiment
Guatemala
JEL: 
I14
O15
C93
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/legalcode
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
482.73 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.