Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/115489
Authors: 
Ardanaz, Martin
Corbacho, Ana
Ruiz-Vega, Mauricio
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IDB Working Paper Series IDB-WP-530
Abstract: 
Gains from government crime-reducing programs are not always visible to the average citizen. The media overexpose crime events, but the absence of crime rarely makes the news, increasing the risk that citizen may have inaccurate perceptions of security. Through a survey experiment carried out in Bogota, Colombia, a city that experienced a substantial reduction in homicides over the last decade, as well as a noticeable drop in robberies, this paper tests the effect that communicating objective crime trends could have on such perceptions. The results show that information improves perceptions of safety and police effectiveness, and lowers distrust in the police. However, the information treatment is not able to impact those with biased priors, and tends to weaken over time. A more active and regular engagement with citizens regarding these trends is needed to bridge the gap between perception and reality.
Subjects: 
Information
Beliefs
Perception
Crime
JEL: 
I38
R28
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
721.69 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.