Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/114577
Authors: 
Ichoku, Hyacinth Eme
Agu, Chukwuma
Ataguba, John Ele-Ojo
Year of Publication: 
2012
Citation: 
[Journal:] International Journal of Economic Sciences and Applied Research [ISSN:] 1791-3373 [Volume:] 5 [Year:] 2012 [Issue:] 3 [Pages:] 147-172
Abstract: 
This study investigates the pro-poorness of income growth in Nigeria. Using nationally representative data for 1996 and 2004, overall income growth in Nigeria was found not to be pro-poor. The richer segments of the population appropriate greater share of benefits from economic growth. Household size was a critical determinant of poverty levels. Sector of employment also impacts on the probability of a household being poor; with those in agriculture being relatively worse off. The need for smaller family size has to be an integral part of policy aimed at poverty reduction in Nigeria. The support of the government in creating value in critical sectors (like agriculture and industry) that employ a large proportion of Nigerians in order to make growth pro-poor is critical. There is also a need for region-specific policies addressing the peculiarities of poverty in the different parts of the country. One size does not fit all. Deliberate effort of the government in redistributing income is also required to ensure pro-poorness of growth in Nigeria.
Subjects: 
Economic growth
pro-poor growth
poverty
Nigeria
JEL: 
I32
O40
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
628.03 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.