Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/111543
Authors: 
Jiménez-Martín, Sergi
Vall-Castello, Judit
del Rey, Elena
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9092
Abstract: 
In this paper we explore the effects of a labor market reform that changed the statutory minimum working age in Spain in 1980. In particular, the reform raised the statutory minimum working age from 14 to 16 years old, while the minimum age for attaining compulsory education was kept at 14 until 1990. To study the effects of this change, we exploit the different incentives faced by individuals born at various times of the year before and after the reform. We show that, for individuals born at the beginning of the year, the probabilities of finishing both the compulsory and the post-compulsory education level increased after the reform. In addition, we find that the reform decreases mortality while young (16-25) for both genders while it increases mortality for middle age women (26-40). We provide evidence to proof that the latter increase is partly explained by the deterioration of the health habits of affected women. Together, these results help explain the closing age gap in life expectancy between women and men in Spain.
Subjects: 
minimum working age
policy evaluation
education
mortality
JEL: 
J01
I26
I12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
661.99 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.