Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/111517
Authors: 
Acemoglu, Daron
Autor, David
Dorn, David
Hanson, Gordon H.
Price, Brendan
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9068
Abstract: 
Even before the Great Recession, U.S. employment growth was unimpressive. Between 2000 and 2007, the economy gave back the considerable employment gains achieved during the 1990s, with a historic contraction in manufacturing employment being a prime contributor to the slump. We estimate that import competition from China, which surged after 2000, was a major force behind both recent reductions in U.S. manufacturing employment and - through input-output linkages and other general equilibrium channels - weak overall U.S. job growth. Our central estimates suggest job losses from rising Chinese import competition over 1999 through 2011 in the range of 2.0 to 2.4 million.
Subjects: 
trade flows
labor demand
JEL: 
F16
J23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.19 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.