Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/110998
Authors: 
Verheul, Ingrid
Carree, Martin
Thurik, Roy
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 0106
Abstract: 
This paper investigates time allocation decisions in new ventures of female and male entrepreneurs using a new model that distinguishes between effects of preferences (what they like) and productivity (what they are good at) on the number of working hours. Using data of 1203 entrepreneurs we find that the preference for work time in new ventures is related to the motivation for starting up a business, the propensity to take risk and the availability of other income. Productivity of work time is explained by human, financial and social capital and outsourcing. This study also evaluates actual profit effects one year after start-up. With respect to gender we find that – on average – women invest less time in the business than men. This can be attributed to a lower productivity per hour worked, due to lower endowments of human, social and financial capital.
Subjects: 
time allocation
preferences
productivity
gender
new ventures
JEL: 
J22
L26
M13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
673.66 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.