Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/110946
Authors: 
de Bromhead, Alan
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-03
Abstract: 
This paper examines the lessons of the interwar period to place current concerns regarding a return to protectionism in historical context, highlighting the unique and one-time changes in voting rights that took place during the period and their relationship with trade policy. A particularly novel finding is the impact of women voters on the politics of protectionism. Public opinion survey evidence from the interwar years indicates that women were more likely to hold protectionist attitudes than men, while panel data analysis of average tariff rates during the interwar period shows that when women were entitled to vote tariffs were, on average, higher. This result is supported by an instrumental variables approach using Protestantism as an instrument for female voting rights.
Subjects: 
political economy
suffrage
international trade
gender differences
JEL: 
N40
N70
F50
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
620.21 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.