Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/110590
Authors: 
Grimm, Veronika
Utikal, Verena
Valmasoni, Lorenzo
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IWQW Discussion Paper Series 05/2015
Abstract: 
In this study, we investigate how and why people discriminate among different groups, including their own groups and multiple out-groups. In a laboratory experiment, we use dictator games for five groups to compare actual transfers to in-group and out-group agents with the respective beliefs held by dictators and recipients in these groups. We observe both in-group favoritism and discrimination among multiple out-groups. Individuals expect others to be in-group biased, as well as to be treated differently by different out-groups. Dictators' in-group favoritism is positively related to the degree of in-group favoritism they expect other dictators to exhibit. Moreover, we find that a dictator tends to be relatively more generous toward a specific out-group when he or she expects that dictators belonging to that out-group are generous toward members of his or her ingroup.
Subjects: 
discrimination
experiment
group identity
dictator game
beliefs
JEL: 
C91
C92
D84
D01
D64
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
532.81 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.