Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/110407
Authors: 
Börsch-Supan, Axel
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] Wirtschaftsdienst [ISSN:] 1613-978X [Publisher:] Springer [Place:] Heidelberg [Volume:] 95 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] Sonderheft [Pages:] 16-21
Abstract (Translated): 
Thanks to the reform process between 1992 and 2007, Germany was in a very good position to master demographic change. These reforms were farsighted, they stabilised the public pension system and they significantly increased employment, the foundation of every old age provision. The 'Pension Package 2014', however, is putting this position in jeopardy by focusing on the older generation at the expense of the young, whoich needs more education and better health care, areas in which Germany exhibits only mediocre performance. A farsightedIf a demographicy strategy wants to be farsighted, its core cannot centre onbe reductions in the retirement age and similar expensive steps backwards, but will instead require investments into Germany's youth.
JEL: 
H55
J11
J26
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
155.65 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.