Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/110149
Authors: 
Houser, Daniel
List, John A.
Piovesan, Marco
Samek, Anya
Winter, Joachim K.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8906
Abstract: 
Acts of dishonesty permeate life. Understanding their origins, and what mechanisms help to attenuate such acts is an underexplored area of research. This study takes an economics approach to explore the propensity of individuals to act dishonestly across different economic environments. We begin by developing a simple model that highlights the channels through which one can increase or decrease dishonest acts. We lend empirical insights into this model by using an experiment that includes both parents and their young children as subjects. We find that the highest level of dishonesty occurs in settings where the parent acts alone and the dishonest act benefits the child rather than the parent. In this spirit, there is also an interesting effect of children on parents' behavior: in the child's presence, parents act more honestly, but there are gender differences. Parents act more dishonestly in front of sons than daughters. This finding has the potential of shedding light on the origins of the widely documented gender differences in cheating behavior observed among adults.
Subjects: 
cheating
dishonesty
ethical judgment
social utility
field experiment
JEL: 
C91
D63
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
396.7 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.