Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/110117
Authors: 
Duclos, Jean-Yves
Pellerin, Mathieu
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8917
Abstract: 
We consider changes in the distribution of hourly compensation in Canada using confidential census data and the recent National Household Survey over the last three decades. We find that the coefficient of variation of wages among full-time workers has almost doubled between 1980 and 2010. The rapid growth of the 99.9th percentile is the main driver of that increase. Changes in the composition of the workforce explain less than 25% of the rise in wage inequality. However, composition changes explain most of the increase in average hourly compensation over those three decades, while wages stagnate within skill groups.
Subjects: 
wage distribution
inequality
Canada
composition effects
JEL: 
J11
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
449.44 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.