Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Vertova, Giovanna
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Levy Economics Institute 823
This paper starts with a review of the literature about National Systems of Innovation (NSI), by linking the origin of the concept to the evolutionary theory of the firm and innovation. The first point reviews the flaws of the NSI concept by looking at the pioneering works of Chris Freeman, Bent-Åke Lundvall, and Richard Nelson. These authors' definitions of NSI contain some striking aspects: (1) the definitions are so broad that they can encompass almost everything; (2) although all definitions share the central role played by institutions, the state and its policy are not explicitly mentioned; and (3) it is not clear if the NSI concept is a descriptive or a normative tool. The second point we would like to make is that, when the role of the financial system was finally recognized by evolutionary traditions, it was just added as a "new" element within the NSI. The main aim became one of including the financial system within the NSI and looking for the "right" financial system for the "right" type of innovation. After addressing the weaknesses of the conceptualization of the state within the NSI and the difficulty of the evolutionary theory in understanding the financialization of the economy, our third and last point refers to a new way to view innovations. As Mariana Mazzuccato shows, the state has always been a fundamental, though indirect, actor for the development of certain innovations in certain sectors. Yet this is not enough, especially in a period of crisis. The state should direct innovative activities toward more basic and social needs, thus becoming an 'innovator of first resort."
Government Intervention
Innovator of First Resort
National Systems of Innovation
Supply-side Economics
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
270.08 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.