Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/109105
Authors: 
Ljunge, Martin
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IFN Working Paper 1046
Abstract: 
This paper presents evidence that generalized trust promotes health. Children of immigrants in a broad set of European countries with ancestry from across the world are studied. Individuals are examined within country of residence using variation in trust across countries of ancestry. There is a significant positive estimate of ancestral trust in explaining selfassessed health. The finding is robust to accounting for individual, parental, and extensive ancestral country characteristics. Individuals with higher ancestral trust are also less likely to be hampered by health problems in their daily life, providing evidence of trust influencing real life outcomes. Individuals with high trust feel and act healthier, enabling a more productive life.
Subjects: 
Trust
Social capital
Self assessed health
Subjective health
Self reported health
Cultural transmission
Children of immigrants
JEL: 
D13
D83
I12
Z13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
399.16 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.