Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/108960
Authors: 
Bojanic, Antonio N.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] Latin American Economic Review [ISSN:] 2196-436X [Publisher:] Springer [Place:] Heidelberg [Volume:] 23 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 1-23
Abstract: 
This paper analyzes the causes of corruption in contemporary Bolivia. It argues that, along with the well-documented observation that richer countries tend, on average, to be less corrupt than poorer ones, corruption is directly dependent on FDI inflows, with higher levels of FDI associated with lower levels of corruption and vice versa. Additionally, the findings reveal that a less controlled, more permissive market for coca leaves actually reduces the level of corruption in the country, supporting the hypothesis that the way to a less corrupt Bolivia is by lowering government intervention into this controversial market.
Subjects: 
Latin America
Bolivia
Corruption
Foreign Direct Investment
Coca
JEL: 
D60
D73
H10
O54
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
380.23 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.