Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/108721
Authors: 
Greenwood, Jeremy
Guner, Nezih
Kocharkov, Georgi
Santos, Cezar
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8831
Abstract: 
Marriage has declined since 1960, with the drop being bigger for non-college educated individuals versus college educated ones. Divorce has increased, more so for the non-college educated. Additionally, positive assortative mating has risen. Income inequality among households has also widened. A unified model of marriage, divorce, educational attainment and married female labor-force participation is developed and estimated to fit the postwar U.S. data. Two underlying driving forces are considered: technological progress in the household sector and shifts in the wage structure. The analysis emphasizes the joint role that educational attainment, married female labor-force participation, and assortative mating play in determining income inequality.
Subjects: 
assortative mating
education
married female labor supply
household production
marriage and divorce
inequality
JEL: 
E13
J12
J22
O11
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
478.37 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.