Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/108607
Authors: 
Ertac, Seda
Gurdal, Mehmet Y.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Koç University-TÜSİAD Economic Research Forum Working Paper Series 1227
Abstract: 
This paper explores the effect of personality traits on: (1) the willingness to make risk-taking decisions on behalf of a group, (2) the nature of "choice shifts", i.e. the difference between the amount of risk taken in the group context and individually. Openness and agreeableness emerge as significant determinants of the willingness to lead: non-leader women and non-leader men score lower on openness and higher in agreeableness compared to both leader men and leader women. Neuroticism explains the within-gender variance in individual risk-taking among women, who are on average more risk-averse than men. Subjects in general behave more cautiously when they are making risky decisions on behalf of a group. Among men, a higher agreeableness score implies higher caution in group decisions, while conscientiousness leads to less caution. In contrast, among women, a higher conscientiousness score implies higher caution in the group context, suggesting that the two genders might interpret the social norms in group decision-making differently.
Subjects: 
personality
leadership
gender
group decision-making
risk
choice shifts
experiments
JEL: 
C91
C92
D81
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.