Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/107793
Authors: 
Arribas-Bel, Daniel
Nijkamp, Peter
Poot, Jacques
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 14-081/VIII
Abstract: 
Cultural diversity is a complex and multi-faceted concept. Commonly used quantitative measures of the spatial distribution of culturally-defined groups 'such as segregation, isolation or concentration indexes' are often only capable of identifying just one aspect of this distribution. The strengths or weaknesses of any measure can only be comprehensively assessed empirically. This paper provides evidence on the empirical properties of various spatial measures of cultural diversity by using Monte Carlo replications of agent-based modeling (MC-ABM) simulations with synthetic data assigned to a realistic and detailed geographical context of the city of Amsterdam. Schelling's classical segregation model is used as the theoretical engine to generate patterns of spatial clustering. The data inputs include the initial population, the number and shares of various cultural groups, and their preferences with respect to co-location. Our MC-ABM data generating process generates output maps that enable us to assess the performance of various spatial measures of cultural diversity under a range of demographic compositions and preferences. We find that, as our simulated city becomes more diverse, stable residential location equilibria are only possible when particularly minorities become more tolerant. We test whether observed measures can be interpreted as revealing unobserved preferences for co-location of individuals with their own group and find that the segregation and isolation measures of spatial diversity are shown to be non-decreasing in increasing preference for within-group co-location, but the Gini coefficient and concentration measures are not.
Subjects: 
cultural diversity
spatial segregation
agent-based model
Monte Carlo simulation
JEL: 
C63
J15
R23
Z13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.26 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.