Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/107507
Authors: 
Glick, Peter
Sahn, David E.
Walker, Thomas F.
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8731
Abstract: 
This paper measured the extent to which households in Madagascar adjust children's school attendance in order to cope with exogenous shocks to household income, assets and labour supply. Our analysis was based on a unique data set with 10 years of recall data on school attendance and household shocks. We found that the probability of a child dropping out of school increased significantly when the household experienced an illness, death or asset shock. We proposed a test to distinguish whether the impact of shocks on school attendance could be attributed to credit constraints, labour market rigidities, or a combination of the two. The results of the test suggested that credit constraints, rather than labour market rigidities, explain the inability of households in Madagascar to keep their children in school during times of economic distress.
Subjects: 
education
development
household shocks
time allocation
labor supply
Madagascar
JEL: 
I25
J22
D13
E24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.