Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/106560
Authors: 
Duleep, Harriet
Liu, Xingfei
Regets, Mark
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8628
Abstract: 
Using microdata from the 1960-2000 decennial censuses, this paper explores how large initial differences in immigrant earnings by country of origin change with duration in the United States. One analysis reveals that country of origin adds less to the explanation of earnings, among working-age adult male immigrants, the longer they reside in the United States. Another discovers that the earnings dispersion of demographically comparable immigrants across countries of origin diminishes with time in the United States. Both indicate convergence in immigrant earnings by country of origin. To probe the sensitivity of these results to immigrant emigration, we pursue a theoretical analysis, which gauges how hypothetical patterns of selective emigration affect the convergence results, and an empirical analysis, which could be more broadly applied as a test for emigration bias. Both suggest that immigrant earnings convergence by country of origin is not an artifact of emigration. The convergence has methodological ramifications for the measurement of immigrant economic assimilation – in studies that follow cohorts and in studies that follow individuals with longitudinal data – and more generally for the study of any process in which unmeasured variables jointly affect initial conditions and subsequent growth.
Subjects: 
immigrant economic assimilation
human capital investment
country of origin
immigrant earnings convergence
JEL: 
J1
J2
J3
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
594.67 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.